Cloud Computing Session 02: Present like Steve Jobs

27 novembre 2015

Presentation: How to present like Steve Jobs

Presentation Faults

Visit EnglishPage - Simple Future: Simple Future has two different forms in English: "will" and "be going to." Although the two forms can sometimes be used interchangeably, they often express two very different meanings. These different meanings might seem too abstract at first, but with time and practice, the differences will become clear. Both "will" and "be going to" refer to a specific time in the future.

Exercise 01: Will and Be Going To

Exercise 02: Will and Be Going To

Exercise 03: Will and Be Going To

How to Give a Killer Presentation: A little more than a year ago, on a trip to Nairobi, Kenya, some colleagues and I met a 12-year-old Masai boy named Richard Turere, who told us a fascinating story. His family raises livestock on the edge of a vast national park, and one of the biggest challenges is protecting the animals from lions—especially at night. Richard had noticed that placing lamps in a field didn’t deter lion attacks, but when he walked the field with a torch, the lions stayed away. From a young age, he’d been interested in electronics, teaching himself by, for example, taking apart his parents’ radio. He used that experience to devise a system of lights that would turn on and off in sequence—using solar panels, a car battery, and a motorcycle indicator box—and thereby create a sense of movement that he hoped would scare off the lions. He installed the lights, and the lions stopped attacking. Soon villages elsewhere in Kenya began installing Richard’s “lion lights.”

 

The story was inspiring and worthy of the broader audience that our TED conference could offer, but on the surface, Richard seemed an unlikely candidate to give a TED Talk. He was painfully shy. His English was halting. When he tried to describe his invention, the sentences tumbled out incoherently. And frankly, it was hard to imagine a preteenager standing on a stage in front of 1,400 people accustomed to hearing from polished speakers such as Bill Gates, Sir Ken Robinson, and Jill Bolte Taylor.

But Richard’s story was so compelling that we invited him to speak. In the months before the 2013 conference, we worked with him to frame his story—to find the right place to begin, and to develop a succinct and logical arc of events. On the back of his invention Richard had won a scholarship to one of Kenya’s best schools, and there he had the chance to practice the talk several times in front of a live audience. It was critical that he build his confidence to the point where his personality could shine through. When he finally gave his talk at TED, in Long Beach, you could tell he was nervous, but that only made him more engaging—people were hanging on his every word. The confidence was there, and every time Richard smiled, the audience melted. When he finished, the response was instantaneous: a sustained standing ovation. Read the full article: Harvard Business Review

Negative points:

Reading, too much text, closed body language, no eye contact, speaking too quickly, not waiting for a response to a question & a PowerPoint that is not professional.

Positive points:

Set the theme (give a headline), give an outline (and then transition between sections), be positive, quantify numbers, give a show, rehearse and end the presentation with a bonus.

Read 1852 times Last modified on lundi, 30 novembre 2015 08:58
Marvin Wilkinson

Having worked in consumer insight and communications throughout is career in London, Marvin's blog posts focus on the trends, business strategies & communication techniques that he often uses in class.  You'll also find the occasional video of his students' projects...

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